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May 15, 2011

Why the Google Chromebook will fail?

So Google finally announced the Chromebooks and first units will be shipping in the US and Europe by June 15. Both Samsung and Acer are set to ship out their own variants of the Chromebook.

Here are the two models with their listed specs. They’ve omitted how much HDD storage and RAM will be included in the units.


Samsung Chromebook
Intel Atom Dual-Core Processor
12.1″ (1280×800) 300 nit Display
3.26 lbs / 1.48 kg
8.5 hours of battery life
Built in dual-band WiFi and World-mode 3G (optional)
HD Webcam with noise cancelling microphone
2 USB 2.0 ports
4-in-1 memory card slot
Mini-VGA port
Fullsize Chrome keyboard
Oversize fully-clickable trackpad
Price: $429


Acer Chromebook
Intel Atom Dual-Core Processor
11.6″ HD Widescreen CineCrystal LED-backlit LCD
3.19 lbs | 1.45 kg
6 hours battery life
Built in dual-band WiFi and World-mode 3G (optional)
HD Webcam with noise cancelling microphone
High-Definition Audio Support
2 USB 2.0 ports
4-in-1 memory card slot
HDMI port
Fullsize Chrome keyboard
Oversize fully-clickable trackpad
Price: $349

The biggest draw of the Google Chromebook is its full integration with the Cloud — all the time, anytime.

And that’s where it might just fail.

  • The Cloud does not have 100% uptime guarantee. Amazon’s service recently went down, Google’s Blogger also had an outage the other day and we all know GMail also suffered a number of outages before. People don’t trust the cloud as much as they trust physical hardware.
  • Internet connection is unreliable so your ISP will also play a big role in the over-all user-experience with the Chromebook. And we all know how “unreliable” all our local internet service providers are.
  • The Cloud is expensive. The Chromebook assumes you have unlimited data. In the Philippines, that’s an additional Php1,200 per month. If the life span of your Chromebook is 2 years, that’s Php28,800 on top of the cost of the unit making the total cost of ownership (TCO) much more expensive.

But that scenario is just from a Philippine perspective. It might be totally different elsewhere. So the question is — will you buy a Chromebook instead of a regular netbook?

So where's our Google Chromebook now?
Google to sell Samsung Chromebook for $249

35 Responses to “Why the Google Chromebook will fail?”

  1. gr8.light says:

    With a 800mb bandwidth limit here in the Philippines, yes, it will fail.

    • boy_fanboy says:

      Thanks to the bandwidth limit here in the Philippines these “netbooks” will surely fail.

      Goodbye Cloud Computing.
      End of story.

  2. Ed says:

    Thank goodness Philippines != World.

  3. g00gle88 says:

    That’s why its only available in 7 countries where people can afford it and the infrastructure is stable.

  4. Iyan Sommerset
    Twitter: iyansommerset
    says:

    Yey! Cloud computing!!! …beep!

    “You have reached your monthly bandwidth cap limit.”

    Doh!

    • techguy says:

      I agree. The unreliable internet connection in the country and the bandwidth capping would definitely be an issue.
      “…Would you like to purchase additional bandwidth?”
      “If you choose no, you can still play solitaire in this computer..” :)

  5. Vic
    Twitter: viclogic
    says:

    Chromebook just out in the market today. But since it is still a book with a keyboard, it may not seems to compete with the uprising tablets.

  6. Taylor Miles
    Twitter: tayloramiles
    says:

    Your logic here is not complete for several reasons:

    1. If internet speed continues to be an issue in the Philippines the entire tech industry in ph will FAIL. Is that what you want? Cloud computing is the future.
    2. You can still use most applications offline including Gmail. and many more to come.
    http://chrome.blogspot.com/2011/08/be-more-productive-with-gmail-offline.html

    http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/09/offline-google-docs.html

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Abe is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of YugaTech. You Can follow him on Twitter @abeolandres.

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