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July 02, 2012

Android 4.1 JellyBean on Galaxy Nexus Upgrade Guide

It’s only been days since the new Android Jelly Bean was announced but folks at RootzWiki have already ported the buttery OS for Galaxy Nexus users. Find out how you can install Android 4.1 on your Galaxy Nexus after the break.

Just a reminder before you attempt this: This site, the developers and Rootzwiki will not be responsible for any malfunctions that this custom ROM may cause to your device. In short: DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK. Another thing, this is not the official release of Android 4.1 and some features of the phone or the OS may not work as normal.

You need to have your phone rooted and unlocked in order to do this. We’ve already tackled how to do this on our previous post (http://www.yugatech.com/software/reverting-the-nexus-s-on-ics-to-gingerbread/) on how to revert to GB from ICS on Nexus S and that should also work for Galaxy Nexus. You can follow steps 1-26 but SKIP STEP #5, 6 and 13.

After successfully unlocking and rooting your device, you’re basically done with the hard part and the next steps on how to install the Android 4.1 custom ROM will be relatively easy. Just follow these steps below:

1. Download Custom ROM here.

2. Download XXLF1 Baseband here.

3. Download RootFix here

6. Turn your phone off and reboot to fastboot (press both the Power and Volume Up buttons at the same time).

7. Choose Recovery on the selection. Wait until the phone has rebooted to ClockworkMod Recovery.

8. Select Apply Update from /sdcard and choose the custom ROM

9. Let it do its thing and after a minute of two you’ll get a prompt like this Install SD card complete.

10. Repeat Step #8, only this time select the Baseband file.

11. Let it do its thing and after a minute of two you’ll get a prompt like this Install SD card complete.

12. Repeat Step #8 only this time select the RootFix file.

13. Let it do its thing and after a minute of two you’ll get a prompt like this Install SD card complete.

14. Reboot your device afterwards and you’ll be greeted with the buttery Jelly bean OS.

According to RootzWiki, there were users who experienced random boot issues and getting stuck at boot logo. The devs said that if such things happened just wait for a couple of minutes and the device should resume normally.

So that’s how you manually port Android 4.1 on your GSM Galaxy Nexus. If you feel that the steps are too risky then don’t try it and just wait for the official OTA update which is scheduled to roll out on mid-July this year for Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S. But if in case you did try it and encountered some bumps along the way, we’ll try to help you out as far as we can {source}.

If you want to be the first few to experience Jelly Bean then feel free to install the custom ROM. But if you’re not that type, then just wait for the official OTA update coming this mid-July and hopefully there won’t be any delays on that {source}.


5 Responses to “Android 4.1 JellyBean on Galaxy Nexus Upgrade Guide”

  1. Cezar Roxas says:

    Worth the risk! I’ve been using Jelly Bean since Friday and everything is smooth as butter! Even the Google Search is better than Siri after comparing to my friend’s 4S.

    • Zo says:

      any hiccups with the usual things? texting, calling, wifi, 3G, etc.?

      I’m still contemplating on doing the same thing on my gnex :)

    • Cezar Roxas says:

      In my experience, everything mentioned works!
      Offline voice typing, Google Now and the voice-response in search works like magic.

      But if you use Viber a lot, you have to wait for the update since it still crashes.

    • Zo says:

      thanks so much! i’ve searched the XDA forums as well, and there are other roms with JB na rin. AND i just read that Google just released JB to AOSP. So it’s just a matter of time til we all start chewing on jelly bean :D

  2. anz says:

    I got my gnex from smart plan. is my gnex consider as gsm gnex? I want to
    upgrade my phone but i dont know when is the update will be available
    on air.

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This article was written by Ronnie Bulaong, a special features contributor and correspondent for YugaTech. Follow him on Twitter @turonbulaong.

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