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Moto X vs. the world’s flagship phones; specs comparison




The Motorola Moto X is one of the tech industry’s worst kept secrets, and the hype has been everywhere since the day Google bought Motorola. Now that it’s finally official, let’s have a look on how it stacks up against the competition, especially since Motorola is calling the Moto X its future.

moto x vs flagships

Motorola Moto X vs. Android competition

MOTO X VS THE WORLD

When compared to its Android counterparts, you’ll find that except for the light weight of the device, the Moto X can’t boast that much when it comes to specs; it has the smallest display among the bunch together with the HTC One & it’s the only device not running on a 1080p display & a quad-core CPU.

It runs 2GB RAM and an Adreno 320 GPU together with the competition, and while it may be running on just a dual-core CPU, the Moto X does feature two more cores for language and contextual computing.

The Galaxy Note 3, Optimus G2 and other phones like the Xperia Z Ultra are already on their way, and those things will pack a lot more power than the ones listed above. Is the Moto X even trying to compete?

Motorola Moto X vs Apple iPhone 5 vs Nokia Lumia 1020 vs BlackBerry Z10

MOTO X VS IPHONE LUMIA BLACKBERRY


Unlike its comparison to the Android superphones, the Moto X stands a better chance in a spec shootout with other platformers. While it might have the lowest pixel density, the phone packs the largest screen at 4.7-inches this time, and it has the most updated chipset and the largest battery.

Also, in a megapixel fight, the 10MP shooter easily overtakes the ones on the iPhone 5 and the Z10 (but then again, megapixels aren’t everything).

It’s also the thickest along with the Lumia 1020 at 10.4mm, but other than that, the Moto X doesn’t seem to fail when put side-to-side with its iOS / BlackBerry OS / Windows Phone rivals.

Conclusion

When put beside the big names in Android, the Moto X looks small, weak & underpowered on paper. However, if you put it beside other platformers, it finds itself above them in theory overall. What does this mean for the Motorola Moto X?

Well, great spec sheets don’t immediately translate to great sales and great experiences. The seemingly underpowered iPhone 5 takes a significantly huge share of the market when compared to most phones in this comparison, making them quite irrelevant. We guess the whole reason and story behind the Moto X isn’t the specs; it’s definitely more than that.

Besides, a 720p display on a 4.7-inch display isn’t that bad, is it? Not everyone needs a 5-inch 1080p display, but some might want that simple feeling of contentment for choosing their phone color combination.

Anyways, it seems like Motorola is trying to make a huge leap here, and they’re focusing on the North American market for the meantime; bringing the said phone here to the Philippines can be a problem, especially with all the customization options.

But even if the phone seems irrelevant to the Philippine market, at least we know what Google’s game is – it’s more about the experience now from here on out.

You can read all about the Motorola Moto X here.



Bob Freking occasionally contributes articles to the website. He is a UST Graduate of Commerce & Business Administration, Major in Marketing Management, and a full-time Sith Lord with three dragons.

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12 Responses

  1. AdrianU says:

    By my experience with Google Devices starting with the Nexus S, I can say that they can only be the best of the last generation. There are exceptions of course like the Google Edition Phones but this rule generally holds true especially for the Nexus branded phones.

    And it makes sense to use this model. Google sells services; the hardware comes second. A large chunk of Google’s revenues come from ads in search.

    A mid-spec device is gonna appeal to a much broader demographic. Couple that with unparalleled customization, subtle background software features, and tight integration with Google’s online services and you’ve got a winner.

    Though personally, I prefer a bit more horsepower under the hood. Lucky there’s CyanogenMod.

  2. Benchmark says:

    Well sa opinion ko, they are selling this phone sa mga not that so techie…yun bang they don’t care about the specs…as long as it is a working phone…kasi the way I see it, some people buy by the color…as you can see, the customizable color somewhat looks appealing. Yun lang, pang US lang yun customizing na yun. Probably if that will reach sa shores, maybe the common black and white yan…maybe sa ibang on line store, the might handle with selections, yun lang, additional cost yan for sure.

  3. AverageJuan says:

    This is phone is not intended for geeks who are into specs. Moto X is intended for average consumers… A good explanation by MKBHD can be found here -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZX8graseUQ

  4. awdog says:

    Hindi ata aabot dito sa pInas and phone na to. who cares this is too expensive US$600+ for mid specs. buy na lang kayo ng s4 or htc one.

    • AdrianU says:

      The price is definitely the biggest downer with device. And considering that the full customization will only be available in the at&t variant, it really is disappointing.

      They’re definitely going with the features vs. price approach with this one. Although I really can’t see how software features can justify the flagship level price tag.

      We geeks probably would care more for raw specs than feature set. Flashing is always a viable option if you want some extra software bling.

  5. Ric says:

    I noticed that the HTC One’s camera is on the red for having 4 megapixels only. This is somewhat misleading as it implies that it is the most inferior among the phones being compared. While this is true on a megapixel standpoint, it is not indicative of the camera’s overall quality.

    I’d remove the red since we don’t even know what the Moto X’s camera is fully capable of.

    • wolftech says:

      I also think the article is very misleading as said the HTC One may have 4mp but its quality is in par with the other higher models. As for the processor it may only have dual core but it is not an ordinary dual core but “custom-built Motorola X8 Mobile Computing System, which is based on a Snapdragon S4 Pro chip with two Krait cores, clocked at 1.7 GHz each, but adds extra processors for various specialized tasks.”.

      It should not judge only by numbers on the label. Am just curious how did they find out the custom krait S4 Pro performs better than the regular S4 Pro in real life?

      As for comparing hardware specs to other OS is a very bad practice, Android needs quadcore to run smoothly but WP8 and IOS runs smoothly on lower cores also. I

    • wolftech says:

      I also think the article is very misleading as said the HTC One may have 4mp but its quality is in par with the other higher models. As for the processor it may only have dual core but it is not an ordinary dual core but “custom-built Motorola X8 Mobile Computing System, which is based on a Snapdragon S4 Pro chip with two Krait cores, clocked at 1.7 GHz each, but adds extra processors for various specialized tasks.”.

      It should not judge only by numbers on the label. Am just curious how did they find out the custom krait S4 Pro performs better than the regular S4 Pro? maybe a reference i suppose?

      As for comparing hardware specs to other brands with different OS is a very bad practice, Android needs quadcore to run smoothly but WP8 and IOS runs smoothly on lower cores also, I have an iphone4 has single core but it runs smoothly like a dual or quadcore on games like android no lag even :) pls don’t compare everything with numbers on a spec sheet for it to be the best.

  6. techatbp says:

    When i saw the article’s comparison, tinignan ko agad kung sino nagsulat. haha..

    napaka misleading kasi, lalo na dun sa magkakaibang OS, dapat wala ng “Yellow and Red” comparison. Halatang hindi ganun ka”techie” ang author nito, yung tipong “more power = better phone” ang alam.

  7. jackbw9 says:

    Specs comparisons are for geeks. They don’t always translate proportionally to real-world differences.

    Take the battery specs for example: some phones have a larger battery but they have shorter battery life in actual use. The bigger battery didn’t translate to longer battery life; all it did was add more weight. Then there’s the camera comparison: the one with less megapixels actually takes better photos.

    I’m a geek myself but I think geeks should focus less on specs and more on actual performance — assuming they actually used the phone, which often isn’t the case.

  8. luisn says:

    The Moto X doesn’t top the charts in terms of specs, but it fares far from the other flagship phones in terms of its unique features.
    Check this video out.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJTlB_S7ct0

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