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PH Government to impose regulations on ‘hoverboards’




Since the fiasco of exploding so-called hoverboards, a lot are expressing dismay and concern over the use of the self-balancing two-wheeled board. The trader and health departments of our local government are now taking action over the matter and will impose regulations, as reported by ABS-CBN.

hoverboard_11

Sellers or importers of ‘hoverboards’ should comply with the following markings on the packaging of the product:
1. The package should indicate that it is NOT a toy.
2. The package should tell that it is suitable for 14y.o. and above.
3. For indoor use only.
4. The battery should have passed the International Electrical Committee (IEC) and International Standards Organization (ISO) certification.

When the regulation order is published, importers will have two weeks to comply. The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and Department of Health (DOH) will do on-the-spot inspection afterwards.

Source



This article was contributed by Daniel Morial, a film school graduate and technology enthusiast. He's the geeky encyclopedia and salesman among his friends for anything tech.

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3 Responses

  1. Imagi says:

    why for indoor use only?

  2. Mat says:

    These “regulations” are interesting, but I question numbers 2 and 3.

    As I can tell, number 2 is to limit potential injury, but I see more adults (over 14) getting injured while trying to do stupid stunts. My daughter, who’s under 14, has never had a scratch. Its the same with her friends. I see usage akin to riding a bicycle in that competence isn’t dictated by age. There are also weight limits to consider as its more likely that people over 14 reach it. Follow the manual and take time to learn. Even a hula-hoop could injure if not used properly, but others should’t suffer regulation because of the actions of irresponsible people.

    Number three is strange as proximity to enclosed spaces doesn’t affect operation. Terrain does, however, but this is covered in the manual. This is a limit that any form of conveyance suffers from and doesn’t need regulation. Now, it was mentioned by another poster that sunlight may compromise the device. I don’t see how this can be an issue unless we’re looking at STORAGE. If this is the case, then it should be indicated as such.

    While I’m glad that the Government is interested in protecting the public (I’m all for number 4), however, they shouldn’t confuse fear with safety.

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